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It’s been nine months since Cornell University’s “Corpse Plant” bloomed, and we’re catching up with Wee Stinky, as it came to be called. Find out about how successful pollination was, where Wee Stinky’s seeds are going, and what we’ve learned about its smells.

Sunset in the Arboretum. Photo by Kevin Emr ‘10
Like arboreta world-wide, the F.R. Newman Arboretum is a place for the scientific study and public exhibition of a diversity of trees and shrubs.
Before becoming an arboretum, this area was part of a working farm, and served as a pasture for the Cornell Department of Animal Science’s herd of Black Angus cattle. In 1935, 200 men from the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) set up camp south of Cascadilla Creek, and worked in what is now the arboretum for six years. Through all seasons, they cleared and graded the land, constructed stone walls, built roads, and planted trees. By 1941, they had built four miles of roads and eight miles of paths, prepared seven thousand cubic yards of compost, and planted thousands of trees and shrubs. Feeding, clothing, and paying these men cost the government about $200,000. A similar project today would cost over ten million dollars. In 1981, with the encouragement and financial generosity of Floyd R. “Flood” Newman ’12, the arboretum’s construction began, taking care to follow the area’s topography and making maximum use of existing plants. During the Cornell Class of 1912’s 70th reunion in 1982, over 100 guests heard Newman speak at the arboretum’s dedication.

Sunset in the Arboretum. Photo by Kevin Emr ‘10

Like arboreta world-wide, the F.R. Newman Arboretum is a place for the scientific study and public exhibition of a diversity of trees and shrubs.

Before becoming an arboretum, this area was part of a working farm, and served as a pasture for the Cornell Department of Animal Science’s herd of Black Angus cattle. In 1935, 200 men from the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) set up camp south of Cascadilla Creek, and worked in what is now the arboretum for six years. Through all seasons, they cleared and graded the land, constructed stone walls, built roads, and planted trees. By 1941, they had built four miles of roads and eight miles of paths, prepared seven thousand cubic yards of compost, and planted thousands of trees and shrubs. Feeding, clothing, and paying these men cost the government about $200,000. A similar project today would cost over ten million dollars. In 1981, with the encouragement and financial generosity of Floyd R. “Flood” Newman ’12, the arboretum’s construction began, taking care to follow the area’s topography and making maximum use of existing plants. During the Cornell Class of 1912’s 70th reunion in 1982, over 100 guests heard Newman speak at the arboretum’s dedication.


A team of CALS researchers is studying living great whites and other sharks — as well as fossilized teeth — to gain insight into sharks today as well as their ancient ancestors. The study of shark teeth has been dormant for decades, but the scientists are renewing it using the latest computer-aided imaging technology. Here, graduate student Josh Moyer, who works with ecology and evolutionary biology professor Willy Bemis, explains how detailed high-resolution, three-dimensional models of shark tooth anatomy tell a story of development and evolution. Find out more about the wonders of the 3D imaging technology used by Cornell researchers in the Spring ‘13 periodiCALS web exclusive.

AP Twitter hack is yet another reminder that social media isn’t simply banal messages about breakfast between teenagers, but that it can have massive, real world consequences.
Our trust of social media has reached new levels. It’s amazing that things like social media have gone from something the ‘kids do’ to affecting how the market operates.
This response also highlights that humans have a built in truth bias to believe what others say. Although there is a lot of suspicion about the Internet in general, the truth bias is alive and well with social media.
Read more: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/04/23/hack-attack-on-associated-press-shows-vulnerable-media/2106985/
Jeff Hancock, a professor of communication and of computer and information science at Cornell University, is a frequent social media analyst on national news shows and co-author of a landmark study on honesty in online communications.
Shoals Marine Lab’s “flagship” research vessels: R/V John M. Kingsbury and the R/V John B. Heiser docked in Portsmouth, NH. Photo by Shoals staff member, Dr. Jim Coyer.
Shoals Marine Laboratory is a seasonal marine field station located on Appledore Island Maine. Appledore Island is the largest of the Isles of Shoals archipelago, a group of rocky islands just offshore of the border between Maine and New Hampshire. The laboratory is cooperatively operated and maintained by Cornell University and the University of New Hampshire.

Shoals Marine Lab’s “flagship” research vessels: R/V John M. Kingsbury and the R/V John B. Heiser docked in Portsmouth, NH. Photo by Shoals staff member, Dr. Jim Coyer.

Shoals Marine Laboratory is a seasonal marine field station located on Appledore Island Maine. Appledore Island is the largest of the Isles of Shoals archipelago, a group of rocky islands just offshore of the border between Maine and New Hampshire. The laboratory is cooperatively operated and maintained by Cornell University and the University of New Hampshire.

Did you know that virtually all ‎broccoli‬ sold in grocery stores across the U.S. comes from California? Thomas Björkman, associate professor of horticulture, aims to change all that. As principle investigator on the USDA-funded Eastern Broccoli Project, Thomas’ research is dedicated to developing the sweet, crisp nutritional dynamo we know as fresh local broccoli for those of us on this side of the country to enjoy. Check out this great New York Times profile to find out more.
via College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Did you know that virtually all broccoli‬ sold in grocery stores across the U.S. comes from California? Thomas Björkman, associate professor of horticulture, aims to change all that. As principle investigator on the USDA-funded Eastern Broccoli Project, Thomas’ research is dedicated to developing the sweet, crisp nutritional dynamo we know as fresh local broccoli for those of us on this side of the country to enjoy. Check out this great New York Times profile to find out more.

via College of Agriculture and Life Sciences