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Among political utterances in American history, Abraham Lincoln’s 227-word Gettysburg Address stands out as one of the most memorable. On Wednesday, July 30, at 7:00 p.m. in Bailey Hall on the Cornell University campus, Civil War expert Allen Guelzo will examine the elements that help make it so in his talk “‘Little Note or Long Remember’: Why Do We Remember the Gettysburg Address?” The Henry R. Luce Professor of the Civil War Era at Gettysburg College in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Guelzo is the author of numerous books about Lincoln and the Civil War, including Gettysburg: The Last Invasion (2013), which spent eight weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and which won the Lincoln Prize for 2014, the inaugural Guggenheim-Lehrman Prize in Military History, the Fletcher Pratt Award of the New York City Round Table, and the Richard Harwell Award of the Atlanta Civil War Round Table. Sponsored by Cornell’s School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions, this is the last lecture in Cornell’s free summer events series, which ends Friday, August 1, with a concert by Panache Quartet at 7:00 p.m. on the Arts Quad. For more information, visit summer.cornell.edu/events, e-mail cusce@cornell.edu, or call 607.255.4987

Among political utterances in American history, Abraham Lincoln’s 227-word Gettysburg Address stands out as one of the most memorable. On Wednesday, July 30, at 7:00 p.m. in Bailey Hall on the Cornell University campus, Civil War expert Allen Guelzo will examine the elements that help make it so in his talk “‘Little Note or Long Remember’: Why Do We Remember the Gettysburg Address?”

The Henry R. Luce Professor of the Civil War Era at Gettysburg College in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Guelzo is the author of numerous books about Lincoln and the Civil War, including Gettysburg: The Last Invasion (2013), which spent eight weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and which won the Lincoln Prize for 2014, the inaugural Guggenheim-Lehrman Prize in Military History, the Fletcher Pratt Award of the New York City Round Table, and the Richard Harwell Award of the Atlanta Civil War Round Table.

Sponsored by Cornell’s School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions, this is the last lecture in Cornell’s free summer events series, which ends Friday, August 1, with a concert by Panache Quartet at 7:00 p.m. on the Arts Quad. For more information, visit summer.cornell.edu/events, e-mail cusce@cornell.edu, or call 607.255.4987

In the summer of 2014, Cornell’s new students will be reading Amara Lakhous’s Clash of Civilizations Over an Elevator in Piazza Vittorio. Published in Italy in 2008, and translated and published in English in 2010, Clash of Civilizations Over an Elevator in Piazza Vittorio is a cosmopolitan, intercultural murder mystery narrated by the various unique, idiosyncratic, often comically outspoken residents of a modern apartment building in the center of Rome. Learn more.

In the summer of 2014, Cornell’s new students will be reading Amara Lakhous’s Clash of Civilizations Over an Elevator in Piazza Vittorio. Published in Italy in 2008, and translated and published in English in 2010, Clash of Civilizations Over an Elevator in Piazza Vittorio is a cosmopolitan, intercultural murder mystery narrated by the various unique, idiosyncratic, often comically outspoken residents of a modern apartment building in the center of Rome. Learn more.