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Cornell Orientation Steering Committee members and orientation supervisors welcome some of the more than 400 volunteer orientation leaders to Bailey Hall for a day of training Aug. 21 before Move-In Day and Orientation Weekend. Orientation leaders will work in shifts around campus on Move-In Day Aug. 22 and will support nearly 30 events this weekend.

Cornell Orientation Steering Committee members and orientation supervisors welcome some of the more than 400 volunteer orientation leaders to Bailey Hall for a day of training Aug. 21 before Move-In Day and Orientation Weekend. Orientation leaders will work in shifts around campus on Move-In Day Aug. 22 and will support nearly 30 events this weekend.

Cornell Study: Genetics used to improve plants for bioenergy.
An upcoming #genetics investigation into the symbiotic association between soil fungi and feedstock plants for bioenergy production could lead to more efficient uptake of nutrients, which would help limit the need for expensive and polluting fertilizers. Learn more.
Image: shows an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (green) inside Brachypodium distachyon root cells (red). The fungi invade root cells and naturally deliver essential nutrients phosphate and nitrogen - which are necessary for plant growth, development and yield - from the soil to the plants. Jeon Hong and Maria Harrison

Cornell Study: Genetics used to improve plants for bioenergy.

An upcoming #genetics investigation into the symbiotic association between soil fungi and feedstock plants for bioenergy production could lead to more efficient uptake of nutrients, which would help limit the need for expensive and polluting fertilizers. Learn more.

Image: shows an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (green) inside Brachypodium distachyon root cells (red). The fungi invade root cells and naturally deliver essential nutrients phosphate and nitrogen - which are necessary for plant growth, development and yield - from the soil to the plants. Jeon Hong and Maria Harrison

One of the difficulties of addressing Ebola is that it requires intervening in the way that people care for each other – how they reach out, touch, and help each other. People are contagious when they are symptomatic, when they are in need, when they are turning to their loved ones for help.
The spread of this virus highlights our interconnectedness. As public health officials tell people what is not safe to do, they must also work with community members to develop new traditions that are safe in the face of this epidemic. How can people best care for their loved ones? Ebola is not just about illness or even death, is it about the ethics of living, the ethics of caring for family and community even in the face of danger.
Good healers are skillful in conceiving and promoting therapies that intervene in the dynamics of both biological diseases and human relationships. As we respond to the ongoing humanitarian emergency of Ebola we need to consider the social dimensions of healing.
Healers can be valuable partners in addressing Ebola as historically African traditional therapies have addressed both the physical and the social basis of healing simultaneously.
Stacey Langwick, professor of medical anthropology at Cornell University and author of “Bodies, Politics, and African Healing,” comments on the recent effort to stem the spread of Ebola in Africa.
Orientation Steering Committee members conduct team-building exercises for new orientation supervisors between Kay and Bauer halls on North Campus.

Orientation Steering Committee members conduct team-building exercises for new orientation supervisors between Kay and Bauer halls on North Campus.